Home     Blog     About Us     ParentNet®     Get Involved     Resources
We urge you to help make family engagement a priority in education reform. Everyone — parents, schools, and communities —have a responsibility to help kids succeed in school and life! – The Leadership Team
Home of ParentNet�
We are home to ParentNet, a face-to-face family engagement program for parents of children in grades Pre-K to 12. Get quick facts about the program at ParentNet� At-a-Glance.

Meet Our Bloggers
ParentNet® Unplugged offers an online opportunity for frank conversations about family engagement. Please meet our bloggers and engage them in dialogue! Want to keep up with the conversation? Subscribe to new articles by email below.

Subscribe to ParentNet� Unplugged
Sign up to get blog posts by email

Email:

» Privacy Policy

Essential Reads

 Woman reading Essential Reads

» A Culture that Engages Every Family, Steven M. Constantino, Ed.D.

» How to Revitalize Your School-Parent Compact, Marilyn Price-Mitchell, Ph.D.

» How Do You Know if You're Really Open to Partnership, Anne Henderson & Karen Mapp

»PTA--Gateway to Engagement, Advocacy, and Access, Meryl Ain, Ed.D.

» The Power of Asking-Instead of Telling, Jody McVittie, M.D.

» Empathy in Action, Rick Ackerly, Ed.M.



Featured Books
We have the only bookstore on the web that highlights the field of family engagement! Check out our current Editor’s Picks and browse books on 1) Engaging Parents, 2) Building Partnerships, and 3) Leading Culture Change in Schools. Order from our site to support our mission!

Consultant Directory
Looking for consultants, parent educators, trainers, organization development specialists, parent coaches, or speakers who work in the field of family engagement? Check out our Consultant Directory or submit a free listing!



Summer Homework for Parents and Kids

By Meryl Ain, Ed.D.

Summer is here, and both children and adults look forward to a break from the structured routines of the school year. But just because school is out doesn't mean that parents and kids should stop learning.

In general, parents should use the summer months to learn about their children's new school situation. That may simply be finding out who the new teacher is and what the expectations are for the next grade. Or if your child is going to a new school, visit the school and introduce yourself to the principal. Find out what his/her philosophy of education is, and what is required for your child to succeed at this level.  Inquire about how you might contribute your skills and interests for the benefit of the school.

Specifically, you might also want to use this visit to solicit advice about how to keep your children engaged in learning during a long, relaxing summer. Unfortunately, it's often the case that when students return to school after summer vacation, they've lost one to three months of learning.

Research indicates that math skills are most in jeopardy. Elementary students at all socio-economic levels typically lose math skills, while middle class students often make slight gains in reading. But the weak economy has taken its toll on families across the board. Fewer parents will be able to afford camps, tutors, and the plethora of other summer programs that can enrich learning during the summer. And school budget cuts have also reduced free summer educational programs that existed in the recent past.

So what's a parent to do? Here are 10 tips for maintaining your child's skills and learning levels during the summer.

  • Foster the expectation that summer is a time for learning. Ask your child what he/she would like to learn over the summer. It's also helpful if you are a role model for learning. Discuss with your children what you plan on learning this summer.

  • Encourage reading by providing your children with plenty of books that interest them. Use school summer reading lists and library grade-level reading suggestions. Visit the library often and check out special summer events. Read with your children, and discuss the books they are reading with them. If you are really ambitious, organize a book club with a few of your child's friends.

  • Understand that any topic of interest to your child can be a source of learning. For example, if your child is interested in baseball, surround him or her with baseball books and magazines. Watching a baseball game and keeping score or cataloguing baseball cards can be a lesson in statistics, i.e., RBI, ERA.

  • Car trips can evolve into math or geography lessons. Instead of the perennial kid question: "Are we there yet," ask your children to estimate and calculate the travel time to a destination. Encourage your kids to recognize different state license plates, and talk about those states with them, fostering their geography skills.

  • For social studies learning, make day trips to local historical sites. Overnight trips to such venues as Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Gettysburg, and Boston, offer a wealth of information about our nation's history. And for science skills, don't overlook children's science museums and zoos, as well as outdoor natural wonders to explore, such as caves, beaches, and parks.

  • Let your child calculate what the change should be at stores, restaurants, and activities that require admission fees. If your children are old enough, ask them to calculate tips in restaurants.

  • Try word games, including board games, such as Scrabble, and crossword puzzles and Sudoku to build vocabulary. Encourage your child to learn a certain number of new words during the summer.

  • Sharpen your child's math skills by playing games with him or her that require computation, such as Monopoly or dominoes. Let your child be the scorekeeper or "banker." You can also use flash cards to help review addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Go online for worksheets that match your child's learning needs and skill level. Many of these can be printed or downloaded for free.

  • Don't overlook the kitchen as a wonderful learning lab. Involve your children in cooking and preparing meals, and they will exercise their reading, math and science skills. For example, have them read recipes, measure ingredients, and observe how the combination of different ingredients leads to the creation of something amazing. For advanced learning, ask questions, such as how many pints are in a quart, or what made the dough rise?

  • Inspire your children to write about their summer learning experiences. Remember to keep learning fun. You want your children to return to school in September with improved skills and a renewed love of learning!

Photo Credit: Tim Pierce


Posted on June 9, 2012 by Meryl Ain, Ed.D.

Dr. Meryl Ain has worked in several large New York school districts as a central office administrator, teacher, and school building administrator. She writes about education and parenting for Huffington Post, several other publications, and on her blog, You can also follow her on Twitter.

 

Additional Information about our Bloggers
(www.ParentInvolvementMatters.org does not handle reprint requests. For permission to reprint articles, please contact the author directly.)

Permalink   Comments (0)   Send to a Friend

Tags: *Parent Engagement at Home , Learning environment, Parents as teachers

 

Post New Comment
Name:
Email:
Message:
Show Contact Info:
 

 

write my essay Copyright © 2000-2011 National ParentNet Association All rights reserved   |   Sitemap   |   Contact Us   |   Privacy Policy
web design   |   visualscope llc